Suzuki C109R 2009 2010 First Ride

Suzuki C109R 2009 2010 First Ride
Suzuki C109R 2009 2010 First Ride
The C109R's mill is the largest displacement yet on a Suzuki cruiser, with 1783cc of power that runs smoother than comparable engines, I have been riding motorcycles for 41 years. I have owned 2 Harleys,2 Hondas and 3 Suzukis. I stared riding when I was 8 years old. I used to race motocross when I was younger. I just purchased a C-109 RT the touring model Suzuki. This motorcycle is by far the best I have ever ridden on the street, bar none! I loved my Harleys when I had them but they are not in the same league when it comes to the C-109 RT Boulevard.I want to address the issue of depreciation first, I traded in my Suzuki C-50 on this bike and I got all but 400 bucks of the original purchase price and I had the bike for a year and a half. enough said. do not get me wrong here, if there were a Harley that preformed as well as this bike had as much room and comfort as this bike and it was priced in the same range as the Suzuki, I would buy it instead. But that Harley does not exist at this time and probably never will. Here is the bottom line guys, what Motorcycle you choose to ride or not ride does not make you better or worse than the next guy that rides. We are all motocycle enthusiast out there.With GSX-R1000 technology at its disposal, Suzuki engineers used similar downdraft intake ports for the C109R's mill. Which is a good thing, because not only is the 1783cc engine Suzuki's biggest effort in the class to date, but it's got monster 112mm aluminum-alloy pistons that are touted to be "the largest, compared to any gasoline vehicle engine running on the ground." But despite their impressive dimensions, the slipper-type pistons are still relatively lightweight. Suzuki spent a lot of effort keep weight down on the mill in a multitude of ways, including using a compact cylinder head design with a two-stage cam chain drive system and by using components like lightweight shot-peened molybdenum connecting rods.

In developing the C109R's powerplant, it would have been easy for Suzuki to adopt the engine established in its popular M109R power cruiser. But it was looking for a little more pop down low. To achieve its goal, it altered its crankshaft for a claimed 15% increase in crank inertia that boosts power low in the rpm range. It also has different timing on the intake cam that aims to boost low-to-mid range power. The real-world application means it was lively at the throttle and the power delivery was fairly consistent. Response was solid in the lower end and lighter near the top, and for me the meat of its power delivery was between 5000 and 6000 rpm. This falls in line with its claimed peak of 114hp at 5800 rpm.

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