New Suzuki Reno 2009 2010 Reviews and Specification

New Suzuki Reno 2009 2010 Reviews and Specification

The Reno, however, can feel anemic if it's carrying more than one or two people and some cargo. The only engine is a 2.0-liter double overhead cam, inline 4 that generates 126 horses and 131 lb-ft of torque at 4000 rpm.
I heard this engine readily as I drove. I also heard as it downshifted and worked up a noisy buzziness to get the car up hilly roads. This is not a refined, quiet ride.
A 5-speed manual is offered, but the tester had the 4-speed automatic that, at times, shared with passengers its shifting from gear to gear.New Suzuki Reno 2009 2010 Reviews and Specification This isn't the smoothest shifting tranny, and the 22/30-mile-per-gallon, city/highway fuel economy rating for this model of Reno is about mid-pack for the compact car class. Vehicles in the segment that have higher fuel economy include some well-known models, such as the Honda Civic (35/40-mpg with automatic), Toyota Echo (33/39-mpg with automatic), and Toyota Corolla (30/38-mpg with automatic).
Note the Mazda3 hatchback has a more powerful 4 cylinder: A 160-horse 2.3-liter engine capable of 150 lb-ft of torque at 4500 rpm. The Matrix has two 4-cylinder engines, the top one producing 170 horses and 127 lb-ft at 4400 rpm.
The Reno's rack-and-pinion steering and small size make for nimble maneuvers. The ride is fine for a mainstream small car. The car passes over most road bumps without harshness.
But I seemed to hear the impact of expansion cracks and road bumps more than I felt them, making me wonder about the sound insulation of this car. I also noticed the Reno's doors felt lightweight when I opened and closed them, and on a windy day, the Reno was buffeted by crosswinds at times. Also, one rainy day, I felt compelled to close the inside shade on the closed sunroof that was in the test car

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