2010 2011 New Ford Flex Reviews and Specs

New Ford Flex 2010 Reviews and Specs

New Ford Flex 2010 Reviews and Specs




Introduction
The Flex is Ford’s new full-size crossover, which delivers unique styling with a wide, low stance and is characterized by signature side grooves, an all-black greenhouse and a distinctive roof painted in either White Suede or Brilliant Silver. Since Ford has dropped the minivan from the lineup, the Flex is a new alternative to full-size SUVs, offering seating for up to seven occupants and flexible cargo capability.The 2010 Ford Flex will offer an available 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6, the first gasoline direct-injection twin-turbocharged engine produced in North America. Producing 355 horsepower and 350 lb-ft of torque over a broad rpm range, the EcoBoost delivers the power of a V8 with the fuel efficiency of a V6, Ford says. The EcoBoost requires all-wheel drive and will be offered on the SEL and Limited trim levels of the 2010 Flex.quick, hitting 60 in 8.4 seconds, and although it handles relatively well, it isn't terribly thrilling to toss around, due to numb steering and a base curb weight that tops 4800 pounds in all-wheel-drive guise. The Flex EcoBoost, available only with all-wheel drive, adds roughly another 200 pounds. But with 355 hp at 5700 rpm and 350 lb-ft of torque available from 1500 all the way to 5250 rpm — advantages of 93 hp and 102 lb-ft over the naturally aspirated Flex — it feels much, much
New Ford Flex 2010 Reviews and Specsquicker.
We didn't have a chance to strap test equipment to the Flex on our initial drive in mile-high Boulder, Colorado, but Ford claims a 0-to-60 time of 6.8 seconds. Our recent test of the Lincoln MKT, which shares the Flex's platform and EcoBoost powertrain, resulted in a 0-to-60 figure of 6.1 seconds, so we think Ford may be sandbagging a bit.
The blown engine is complemented by the same six-speed automatic transmission found in the standard Flex, only it's enhanced with an overdrive lockout mode with hill descent control, as well as a true manual shift mode. Self-shifting is done via steering-wheel paddles shaped exactly like those on a BMW 3-series, a surprisingly sporty touch for a Brady-grade family hauler. (It's too bad about the cheap black plastic in which they're rendered.) Speaking of grades, the overdrive lockout mode's hill descent control automatically downshifts into an appropriate gear for engine braking when the shifter is set in "M" and the brake is held for a half-second or so.
The hill-descent control works well even while pulling a 2500-pound trailer, which the Flex did with incredible ease at the 7000-plus-foot altitudes we experienced in Colorado. As a forced-induction motor, the EcoBoost V-6 is innately thin-air friendly, which helps explain — but in no way tarnishes — the fact that the Flex EcoBoost proved more adept at light towing than the Chevy Suburban, Toyota Sequoia, and GMC Acadia that Ford brought along for comparison.
But the story of the Flex EcoBoost is not merely one of flexing muscle. The suspension is revised with stiffer springs and revised dampers, which serve to lower the vehicle by 0.4 inch and deliver a nice, taut ride that remains delightfully free of harshness. Roadholding was impressive as we hustled through mountain passes. We did notice a bit of a low rumble emanating from the rear of the vehicle during high-speed cruising, however, as well as a bit of wind noise from the A-pillars — no doubt a byproduct of the tall windshield, which is also responsible for ending many a bug's life (in a splat, not even a smear).

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